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Business of Giving: Follow IBM’s Lead

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As the economy slowly resuscitates, companies might use a slow rebound as an excuse to ignore their social responsibilities. But I ask you to take a lesson from IBM, and not, as the company says, “retreat into our shells,” but rather, “go on the offense.”

Business of Giving: Socialism in America is Impossible

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There has been a lot of debate lately as to whether proposals such as health-care reform will turn America into a socialist state.

Considering what I’ve learned in 35 years working for nonprofits, I confidently say that this can never be the case.

Professor Kwame Anthony Appiah Kicks Off EXCEL in Writing, Thinking and Inquiry at NYU Academy

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Pictured l. to r. Cheryl Ching, The Teagle Foundation, Donna Heiland, The Teagle Foundation, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Ph.D., Princeton University and Richard Buery, President and CEO, The Children’s Aid Society

An Insider CEO's Guide to Finding the Right Philanthropic Match

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In the nonprofit world, the phrase, “we’ll do lunch” has its own meaning in the sense that “lunch” is code for “bring your checkbook.” You (the donor) and I (the nonprofit CEO) will enjoy a meal and then I’m going to pull out all the stops to prove to you why my charity deserves your organization’s financial support.

Changing the Statistics on Teen Pregnancy

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The topic of teen pregnancy prevention has been around so long that I wonder if we sometimes lose site of the terrible statistics behind this issue:

86 adolescents become pregnant every hour of every day

50 adolescents give birth every hour of every day

The Business of Giving: From Homeless to Harvard

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With the markets about as calm as a roller coaster, what we’re thankful for is all too often an afterthought. I don’t know anyone these days who doesn’t treat their stock portfolio as a scene from a gory horror flick: “I’m afraid to look -- but I can’t help it -- oh, I shouldn’t have looked.”

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