Middle Schoolers in the Bronx Address Racism and Violence

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Children’s Aid Society Students to Hold First Annual Young Men’s Conference

Contact:
Ellen Lubell, The Children's Aid Society, (w) 212-949-4938, (c) 917-854-6864
Emily Crossan, The Children’s Aid Society, (w) 917-286-1548, (c) 201-344-5742

When:
Wednesday, May 16, 2007
3:45 – 6:00 p.m.

Where:
The Children’s Aid Society Community Schools C.S. 61/I.S. 190 – auditorium
1550 Crotona Park East
The Bronx

What:
Approximately 100 Bronx middle school students will gather for the First Annual Young Men’s Conference, designed to address the issues of racism and violence that affect youth today, especially African-American and Latino boys. Both boys and girls will attend the conference.

The school’s Young Men’s Group will make presentations about racism and violence in the community. A panel of educators will debate and offer their perspectives to the students. The panel will include teachers and coaches from the host school, Dr. Eugene Adams, Director of Collaborative Programs in the Office of the Vice President of Academic Affairs at Bronx Community College and EMJAY, a musician and hip hop artist.

Student and staff organizers have also invited parents to the conference, in order to engage them in a dialog and enlist their help in implementing proposed solutions.

Who:
The Young Men’s Group was created at The Children's Aid Society’s Community Schools C.S. 61/I. S. 190 early in the 2006-2007 school year to address issues facing young men, especially African-American and Latino males. C.S. 61/I.S. 190 is a Children’s Aid Society Community School. The Children's Aid Society partners with the New York City Department of Education in 21 public schools in Manhattan, the Bronx and Staten Island, bringing a host of needed services directly into the schools to help children learn. Children’s Aid provides medical, dental and mental health services; social services; after-school, evening, weekend and summer hours; adult education and opportunities for expanded parental involvement to its schools, making the school the centerpiece of the community.

The Children’s Aid Society was founded in 1853. It is one of the nation’s largest and most innovative non-sectarian agencies, serving over 150,000 of New York’s neediest children and their families with a network of services that includes community schools, neighborhood centers, camps, adoption and foster care services, teen pregnancy prevention, education, health and recreation. For additional information, please call 212-949-4938 or visit www.childrensaidsociety.org.

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