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Donor Profile: Dr. Bala Ambati

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Before Dr. Bala Ambati became the world’s youngest doctor, an ophthalmologist, at the age of 17, he was a boy in a science lab at a Queens high school. One day, his lab partner, a teenage girl, confessed that she had an abortion the year before. Dr. Ambati could see how much the experience weighed on her, and the gravity of the situation left a deep impression.

Where the Art Starts

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Colorful paintings, expressive masks, and street photography covered the walls of the Boricua College Art Gallery in Washington Heights at the 14th Annual Children’s Art Show, on June 14. The many pieces of art on display came from all corners of the Children’s Aid community, with artists starting as young as our Head Start participants—three and four years old—to our graduating high school seniors.

The Path to Success

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One of the most gratifying experiences we have each year is to share the achievement of so many high school seniors as they graduate and get ready for their next steps. In June, we celebrated 57 young men and women who won more than $150,000 in scholarships as they take aim at higher education.

Keeping the Promise: Sage Lopez

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Sage Lopez is what you might call a Children’s Aid lifer. He first came to our East Harlem Center nine years ago. Today, because of the guidance, support, and hope he has found there and through the center’s Boys & Girls Club, he considers it his second family. Among many things, Sage said, “The club gave me the chance to explore my passion for science, technology, engineering, and math.”

From the CEO

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Dear Friends:

The Children’s Aid Society launched more than 160 years ago with a singular mission: to relieve the abject poverty that gripped orphaned children in New York City. Back then, the city’s social services were severely lacking, and most of society accepted widespread indigence as a simple fact of life.

Keeping the Promise: Christian Minaya

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Christian Minaya‘s mind buzzes with dreams and a hunger to change his circumstances in order to give back to his community. “Can I rap for you?” he asked. “What we believe changes what we perceive, so what we dream changes what we see.”

Children’s Aid Receives 14th Consecutive 4-Star Rating from Charity Navigator

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For a record-breaking 14th consecutive year, The Children’s Aid Society has received a four-star rating from Charity Navigator, the nation’s largest independent charity evaluator, which published its latest ratings this week.

Children’s Aid Society is the only organization in Charity Navigator history to receive 14 consecutive four-star ratings.

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Children's Aid Makes Charity Navigator History

Volunteer Spotlight: Associates Council

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Despite hectic work schedules and busy lives, members of The Children’s Aid Society’s Associates Council (AC) continue to volunteer countless hours of selfless service every year.

From the CEO

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Dear Friends:

It is truly an honor and a privilege to have this letter be one of my first responsibilities as President and CEO of The Children’s Aid Society.

I was part of Children’s Aid once before. After graduating from college, I moved to New York City and worked on a project that launched a medical van that would travel the city and provide health services to those who needed them.

Keeping the Promise: Brianna Collymore-Young

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During her freshman year of high school, Brianna Collymore-Young transferred to the Opportunity Charter School (OCS) in Harlem because her previous school was too big and it was too hard to make friends. “I put up a Great Wall of China,” she said.

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